Ready-mix concrete is a time-sensitive, perishable cargo that frequently requires continuous short runs, sometimes over long periods of time. “We’re a local delivery company, and it’s all short-haul,” Prairie Material Corporate Maintenance Manager Matthew Clarage emphasizes. “Our typical job is 20 minutes away.”

Long hours are typical. “Everything is timed to the minute,” points out Brian Kron, fleet maintenance manager for the northern suburban group in Chicago. “We keep very tight schedules and keep the trucks on the road delivering material.” Continuous pours – such as for a new runway Prairie Material has been pouring for the past year at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport – may have trucks lining up from 3 a.m. to 11 p.m.

In the 1930s, the Port of Stockton – located on the San Joaquin River in north-central California east of San Francisco Bay – handled agricultural products for California’s massive Central Valley farming industry, but then the construction industry grew.

“It used to be we were pretty invested in construction materials,” relates Jeff Wingfield, the port’s director of environmental, government and public affairs. “Cement was our No. 1 commodity for years. Then in the early 2000s – much to the credit of our port commissioners and director – they directed the staff to diversify much more than we were, and thankfully they did, because in 2007 or 2008, cement just dried up.

As many industries are, the trucking industry is becoming more difficult to enter. “The industry is not like it used to be even 10 years ago,” Magnum Cos. President and CEO Wayne Gadberry points out. “The equipment is much more expensive and high tech. Employees have to be trained better than they have in the past. The government does a lot of regulation that you have to comply with. Some of it is good, and some of it you’re not so sure, but you have to comply with it. So you just have to be able to adapt to the technology and try to be more efficient.”

Truckload and LTL shipping are just some of the services that Magnum Cos. provide. They also offer their customers logistics, dedicated fleet services, warehousing and even kitting. “We’re pretty much horizontally integrated throughout the supply chain industry,” Gadberry explains. “One of our trademarks is ‘innovation with value.’ Anybody can be innovative, but if the solution doesn’t have any value, it’s no good. We have very knowledgeable people, and that helps in our industry.”

There are many ferry companies, but the HMS Ferries Division of HMS Global Maritime Co. sets itself apart with the experience it offers customers. “We like to think we’re the recognized experts in the vessel management arena within the United States,” HMS Ferries President and COO Greg Dronkert declares.

Based in Bainbridge, Wash., the division transports passengers, vehicles and other cargo across inland and coastal waterways. Its parent company began as part of Hornblower Cruises & Events, but broke off on its own in 1994.

Since then, the company has filled a niche operating high-speed vessels for various customers, including ferries in the Bahamas, Alaska and Trinidad. “We also operate a high-speed craft for [the U.S.] Military sea command that has been in service since 2010,” Dronkert adds. “We are considered subject matter experts in regard to high-speed crafts.” 

Some carriers are wary about traveling around Colorado’s rugged mountains, but not the drivers of High Country Transportation Inc. This willingness has given the firm a distinct advantage in its market, Vice President Kirk Crowley says.

“We do it, while a lot of companies won’t,” he describes. “It’s a big problem for a lot of drivers, especially during the wintertime. It’s hard work, and road conditions are downright scary at times.”

With its principal offices in Cortez, Colo., and Dallas, Texas, High Country provides nationwide dry van and dry bulk/hopper bottom truckload transportation services. Crowley’s family has a long legacy in the trucking industry, which began in the early 1960s when his grandfather, J.W. Crowley, started a trucking firm with his son, Buzz, as they continued to operate the family farm. Later, another son, Don, joined the company. A grain elevator became part of the operation in 1970.

With their reach across roads, rail and water, chassis represent a critical part of the international supply chain. “Train and container ships depend on them,” Philip Wojcik declares. “Motor carriers need them to deliver the freight.”

Wojcik is the president and CEO of Consolidated Chassis Management (CCM) LLC, an organization that strives to make working with chassis easier. The Budd Lake, N.J.-based, company manages chassis at major ports and metropolitan locations, ranging from the southeastern United States to the Gulf, and inland from the Ohio Valley to the Rockies. CCM credits its success to the fact that it operates with a non-profit philosophy.

The South Jersey Port Corp. (SJPC) – which specializes in handling breakbulk and bulk cargo – is situated on the Delaware River with easy access to the Atlantic Ocean. 

The Beckett Street Terminal and the Broadway Terminal, known as the Port of Camden, annually receive hundreds of ships moving international and domestic cargo through the port’s facilities. “In sheer tonnage, the South Jersey Port Corp. is one of the most productive ports in the world, and the economic impacts to the Delaware Valley region is significant,” the port says. 

In the last 20 years, the SJPC has handled imported wood products and a growing array of steel products including coil steel, slabs, wire rod, structural steel and pipe.

In the 1930s, the Port of Stockton – located on the San Joaquin River in north-central California east of San Francisco Bay – handled agricultural products for California’s massive Central Valley farming industry, but then the construction industry grew.

“It used to be we were pretty invested in construction materials,” relates Jeff Wingfield, the port’s director of environmental, government and public affairs. “Cement was our No. 1 commodity for years. Then in the early 2000s – much to the credit of our port commissioners and director – they directed the staff to diversify much more than we were, and thankfully they did, because in 2007 or 2008, cement just dried up.

Check out our latest Edition!

 

alan blog tli

Contact Us

Transportation and Logistics International

150 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 900
Chicago, IL 60601
312.676.1100  312.676.1101

Click here for a full list of contacts.

Latest Edition

Spread The Love

Back To Top