Tennessee Commercial Warehouse (TCW) draws on its diversified assets to provide services to its customers in the most cost-effective way possible.

“One thing that's unusual about our company is we offer distribution, warehousing, truckload and intermodal services, but not in a silo,” says Scott George, CEO of the Nashville, Tenn.-based company. “You don't normally see companies combine all these modes together, which we do. We believe there's efficiencies that can be gained from doing that.”

Sears Holdings Corp. has seen many things change. But despite increased competition, Sears is leveraging its network and making improvements to maintain its place among the largest U.S. retailers.

Formed in 2005 when Sears, Roebuck and Co. merged with Kmart Holdings Corp, it has roughly 2,600 retail locations. It is a home appliance, tools, lawn and garden, consumer electronics and automotive repair and maintenance leader.

What started out 45 years ago as a small wholesale apparel company selling a Latin clothing staple has transformed itself into an internationally known designer, distributor and licensor of brand name apparel. George Feldenkreis created Supreme International in 1967 and entered the apparel market selling guayaberas – pleated, four-pocket shirts widely worn in the Caribbean. It also was a hit in the Florida market, which is Supreme International’s headquarters. Over the past four decades, Supreme International has purchased other brands to own some of the most widely distributed brands today, including its current namesake – Perry Ellis.

Some manufacturers are rigid in their ways and resistant to change, but not StyroChem. The expandable polystyrene (EPS) manufacturer keeps successful by  customizing for its clients. “We’re [more] willing to take on harder challenges than other manufacturers in our industry, such as customizing formulations,” Director of Technology and Specialty Sales Melissa Wallum says.

Virgil Siedhoff Sr., founder and owner of Siedhoff Distributing, bought a truck in 1954 and started delivering milk in glass bottles door to door. He could not imagine then how much his business would grow over the next five decades. Today, the company has three separate divisions: dairy distribution, trucking and truck repair.

John Ness, president of ODW Log- istics Inc., explains that the fully integrated third-party logistics company makes promises, and those promises help its customers keep theirs, as well. “We don’t produce products,” Ness explains. “We talk about taking care of customer inventory, and making deliveries on time, integrated systems and all the things that we do to partner with clients.”

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